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Kent Anderson Ph.D.

Roast Preacher

Preachers need to have thick skin. Whenever a person gets up in front of a crowd to speak, people are going to evaluate what they have to say – which may be a mild way of describing the kind of scrutiny under which a preacher is placed. Roast Preacher is the most common dish served for Sunday dinner.

Of course if our skin is too thick, we run the risk of not caring for our listeners. Our sermons will come off sounding hard and uncaring. I remember my mother telling me about a conversation she had with a friend when I had just mentioned my interest in getting involved in ministry. "Does he have a soft heart," she asked. "Yes, he does," said my Mother. "Then I’m glad – but at the same time, I’m sorry," my mother’s friend responded.

That’s it exactly. We won’t be any good to our people if our skin is too tough, but if we can’t stand up to the scrutiny we are going to fall apart and be little good to anyone.

The key, of course, is to be deeply grounded in God’s love. When we understand how much God loves us, we will be less susceptible to the pain that people cause. Further, understanding that what we do as preachers is the exercise of God’s love helps to shield us from personal criticism. We preach because God loves. If people don’t like it, they can take it up with God.

It should be added that sometimes people’s criticisms are on the mark. A good preacher will listen for what can be learned from the the things that people say about our preaching. It’s just that we don’t have to take the mean-spirited comments and own them. God loves us and that’s enough. In the freedom his love brings we are able to pursue excellence in our calling so that people hear God’s word and his kingdom is established.

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